PHP Velho Oeste 2024

Magic Methods

Magic methods are special methods which override PHP's default's action when certain actions are performed on an object.

Caution

All methods names starting with __ are reserved by PHP. Therefore, it is not recommended to use such method names unless overriding PHP's behavior.

The following method names are considered magical: __construct(), __destruct(), __call(), __callStatic(), __get(), __set(), __isset(), __unset(), __sleep(), __wakeup(), __serialize(), __unserialize(), __toString(), __invoke(), __set_state(), __clone(), and __debugInfo().

Warning

All magic methods, with the exception of __construct(), __destruct(), and __clone(), must be declared as public, otherwise an E_WARNING is emitted. Prior to PHP 8.0.0, no diagnostic was emitted for the magic methods __sleep(), __wakeup(), __serialize(), __unserialize(), and __set_state().

Warning

If type declarations are used in the definition of a magic method, they must be identical to the signature described in this document. Otherwise, a fatal error is emitted. Prior to PHP 8.0.0, no diagnostic was emitted. However, __construct() and __destruct() must not declare a return type; otherwise a fatal error is emitted.

__sleep() and __wakeup()

public __sleep(): array
public __wakeup(): void

serialize() checks if the class has a function with the magic name __sleep(). If so, that function is executed prior to any serialization. It can clean up the object and is supposed to return an array with the names of all variables of that object that should be serialized. If the method doesn't return anything then null is serialized and E_NOTICE is issued.

Note:

It is not possible for __sleep() to return names of private properties in parent classes. Doing this will result in an E_NOTICE level error. Use __serialize() instead.

Note:

As of PHP 8.0.0, returning a value which is not an array from __sleep() generates a warning. Previously, it generated a notice.

The intended use of __sleep() is to commit pending data or perform similar cleanup tasks. Also, the function is useful if a very large object doesn't need to be saved completely.

Conversely, unserialize() checks for the presence of a function with the magic name __wakeup(). If present, this function can reconstruct any resources that the object may have.

The intended use of __wakeup() is to reestablish any database connections that may have been lost during serialization and perform other reinitialization tasks.

Example #1 Sleep and wakeup

<?php
class Connection
{
protected
$link;
private
$dsn, $username, $password;

public function
__construct($dsn, $username, $password)
{
$this->dsn = $dsn;
$this->username = $username;
$this->password = $password;
$this->connect();
}

private function
connect()
{
$this->link = new PDO($this->dsn, $this->username, $this->password);
}

public function
__sleep()
{
return array(
'dsn', 'username', 'password');
}

public function
__wakeup()
{
$this->connect();
}
}
?>

__serialize() and __unserialize()

public __serialize(): array
public __unserialize(array $data): void

serialize() checks if the class has a function with the magic name __serialize(). If so, that function is executed prior to any serialization. It must construct and return an associative array of key/value pairs that represent the serialized form of the object. If no array is returned a TypeError will be thrown.

Note:

If both __serialize() and __sleep() are defined in the same object, only __serialize() will be called. __sleep() will be ignored. If the object implements the Serializable interface, the interface's serialize() method will be ignored and __serialize() used instead.

The intended use of __serialize() is to define a serialization-friendly arbitrary representation of the object. Elements of the array may correspond to properties of the object but that is not required.

Conversely, unserialize() checks for the presence of a function with the magic name __unserialize(). If present, this function will be passed the restored array that was returned from __serialize(). It may then restore the properties of the object from that array as appropriate.

Note:

If both __unserialize() and __wakeup() are defined in the same object, only __unserialize() will be called. __wakeup() will be ignored.

Note:

This feature is available as of PHP 7.4.0.

Example #2 Serialize and unserialize

<?php
class Connection
{
protected
$link;
private
$dsn, $username, $password;

public function
__construct($dsn, $username, $password)
{
$this->dsn = $dsn;
$this->username = $username;
$this->password = $password;
$this->connect();
}

private function
connect()
{
$this->link = new PDO($this->dsn, $this->username, $this->password);
}

public function
__serialize(): array
{
return [
'dsn' => $this->dsn,
'user' => $this->username,
'pass' => $this->password,
];
}

public function
__unserialize(array $data): void
{
$this->dsn = $data['dsn'];
$this->username = $data['user'];
$this->password = $data['pass'];

$this->connect();
}
}
?>

__toString()

public __toString(): string

The __toString() method allows a class to decide how it will react when it is treated like a string. For example, what echo $obj; will print.

Warning

As of PHP 8.0.0, the return value follows standard PHP type semantics, meaning it will be coerced into a string if possible and if strict typing is disabled.

A Stringable object will not be accepted by a string type declaration if strict typing is enabled. If such behaviour is wanted the type declaration must accept Stringable and string via a union type.

As of PHP 8.0.0, any class that contains a __toString() method will also implicitly implement the Stringable interface, and will thus pass type checks for that interface. Explicitly implementing the interface anyway is recommended.

In PHP 7.4, the returned value must be a string, otherwise an Error is thrown.

Prior to PHP 7.4.0, the returned value must be a string, otherwise a fatal E_RECOVERABLE_ERROR is emitted.

Warning

It was not possible to throw an exception from within a __toString() method prior to PHP 7.4.0. Doing so will result in a fatal error.

Example #3 Simple example

<?php
// Declare a simple class
class TestClass
{
public
$foo;

public function
__construct($foo)
{
$this->foo = $foo;
}

public function
__toString()
{
return
$this->foo;
}
}

$class = new TestClass('Hello');
echo
$class;
?>

The above example will output:

Hello

__invoke()

__invoke( ...$values): mixed

The __invoke() method is called when a script tries to call an object as a function.

Example #4 Using __invoke()

<?php
class CallableClass
{
public function
__invoke($x)
{
var_dump($x);
}
}
$obj = new CallableClass;
$obj(5);
var_dump(is_callable($obj));
?>

The above example will output:

int(5)
bool(true)

Example #5 Using __invoke()

<?php
class Sort
{
private
$key;

public function
__construct(string $key)
{
$this->key = $key;
}

public function
__invoke(array $a, array $b): int
{
return
$a[$this->key] <=> $b[$this->key];
}
}

$customers = [
[
'id' => 1, 'first_name' => 'John', 'last_name' => 'Do'],
[
'id' => 3, 'first_name' => 'Alice', 'last_name' => 'Gustav'],
[
'id' => 2, 'first_name' => 'Bob', 'last_name' => 'Filipe']
];

// sort customers by first name
usort($customers, new Sort('first_name'));
print_r($customers);

// sort customers by last name
usort($customers, new Sort('last_name'));
print_r($customers);
?>

The above example will output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [id] => 3
            [first_name] => Alice
            [last_name] => Gustav
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [id] => 2
            [first_name] => Bob
            [last_name] => Filipe
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [id] => 1
            [first_name] => John
            [last_name] => Do
        )

)
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [id] => 1
            [first_name] => John
            [last_name] => Do
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [id] => 2
            [first_name] => Bob
            [last_name] => Filipe
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [id] => 3
            [first_name] => Alice
            [last_name] => Gustav
        )

)

__set_state()

static __set_state(array $properties): object

This static method is called for classes exported by var_export().

The only parameter of this method is an array containing exported properties in the form ['property' => value, ...].

Example #6 Using __set_state()

<?php

class A
{
public
$var1;
public
$var2;

public static function
__set_state($an_array)
{
$obj = new A;
$obj->var1 = $an_array['var1'];
$obj->var2 = $an_array['var2'];
return
$obj;
}
}

$a = new A;
$a->var1 = 5;
$a->var2 = 'foo';

$b = var_export($a, true);
var_dump($b);
eval(
'$c = ' . $b . ';');
var_dump($c);
?>

The above example will output:

string(60) "A::__set_state(array(
   'var1' => 5,
   'var2' => 'foo',
))"
object(A)#2 (2) {
  ["var1"]=>
  int(5)
  ["var2"]=>
  string(3) "foo"
}

Note: When exporting an object, var_export() does not check whether __set_state() is implemented by the object's class, so re-importing objects will result in an Error exception, if __set_state() is not implemented. Particularly, this affects some internal classes. It is the responsibility of the programmer to verify that only objects will be re-imported, whose class implements __set_state().

__debugInfo()

__debugInfo(): array

This method is called by var_dump() when dumping an object to get the properties that should be shown. If the method isn't defined on an object, then all public, protected and private properties will be shown.

Example #7 Using __debugInfo()

<?php
class C {
private
$prop;

public function
__construct($val) {
$this->prop = $val;
}

public function
__debugInfo() {
return [
'propSquared' => $this->prop ** 2,
];
}
}

var_dump(new C(42));
?>

The above example will output:

object(C)#1 (1) {
  ["propSquared"]=>
  int(1764)
}
add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 22 notes

up
51
jon at webignition dot net
15 years ago
The __toString() method is extremely useful for converting class attribute names and values into common string representations of data (of which there are many choices). I mention this as previous references to __toString() refer only to debugging uses.

I have previously used the __toString() method in the following ways:

- representing a data-holding object as:
   - XML
   - raw POST data
   - a GET query string
   - header name:value pairs

- representing a custom mail object as an actual email (headers then body, all correctly represented)

When creating a class, consider what possible standard string representations are available and, of those, which would be the most relevant with respect to the purpose of the class.

Being able to represent data-holding objects in standardised string forms makes it much easier for your internal representations of data to be shared in an interoperable way with other applications.
up
17
jsnell at e-normous dot com
15 years ago
Be very careful to define __set_state() in classes which inherit from a parent using it, as the static __set_state() call will be called for any children.  If you are not careful, you will end up with an object of the wrong type.  Here is an example:

<?php
class A
{
    public
$var1;

    public static function
__set_state($an_array)
    {
       
$obj = new A;
       
$obj->var1 = $an_array['var1']; 
        return
$obj;
    }
}

class
B extends A {
}

$b = new B;
$b->var1 = 5;

eval(
'$new_b = ' . var_export($b, true) . ';');
var_dump($new_b);
/*
object(A)#2 (1) {
  ["var1"]=>
  int(5)
}
*/
?>
up
12
kguest at php dot net
6 years ago
__debugInfo  is also utilised when calling print_r on an object:

$ cat test.php
<?php
class FooQ {

     private
$bar = '';

     public function
__construct($val) {

        
$this->bar = $val;
     }

     public function
__debugInfo()
     {
         return [
'_bar' => $this->bar];
     }
}
$fooq = new FooQ("q");
print_r ($fooq);

$
php test.php
FooQ Object
(
    [
_bar] => q
)
$
up
8
daniel dot peder at gmail dot com
6 years ago
http://sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/4d2cc3648aed58c0dad90c7868173a4775e5ba0c

IMHO a bug or need feature change

providing a object as a array index doesn't try to us __toString() method so some volatile object identifier is used to index the array, which is breaking any persistency. Type hinting solves that, but while other than "string" type hinting doesn't work on ob jects, the automatic conversion to string should be very intuitive.

PS: tried to submit bug, but withot patch the bugs are ignored, unfortunately, I don't C coding

<?php

class shop_product_id {
   
    protected
$shop_name;
    protected
$product_id;
   
    function
__construct($shop_name,$product_id){
       
$this->shop_name = $shop_name;
       
$this->product_id = $product_id;
    }

    function
__toString(){
        return
$this->shop_name . ':' . $this->product_id;
    }
}

$shop_name = 'Shop_A';
$product_id = 123;
$demo_id = $shop_name . ':' . $product_id;
$demo_name = 'Some product in shop A';

$all_products = [ $demo_id => $demo_name ];
$pid = new shop_product_id( $shop_name, $product_id );

echo
"with type hinting: ";
echo (
$demo_name === $all_products[(string)$pid]) ? "ok" : "fail";
echo
"\n";

echo
"without type hinting: ";
echo (
$demo_name === $all_products[$pid]) ?  "ok" : "fail";
echo
"\n";
up
8
rayRO
18 years ago
If you use the Magical Method '__set()', be shure that the call of
<?php
$myobject
->test['myarray'] = 'data';
?>
will not appear!

For that u have to do it the fine way if you want to use __set Method ;)
<?php
$myobject
->test = array('myarray' => 'data');
?>

If a Variable is already set, the __set Magic Method already wont appear!

My first solution was to use a Caller Class.
With that, i ever knew which Module i currently use!
But who needs it... :]
There are quiet better solutions for this...
Here's the Code:

<?php
class Caller {
    public
$caller;
    public
$module;

    function
__call($funcname, $args = array()) {
       
$this->setModuleInformation();

        if (
is_object($this->caller) && function_exists('call_user_func_array'))
           
$return = call_user_func_array(array(&$this->caller, $funcname), $args);
        else
           
trigger_error("Call to Function with call_user_func_array failed", E_USER_ERROR);
       
       
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
        return
$return;
    }

    function
__construct($callerClassName = false, $callerModuleName = 'Webboard') {
        if (
$callerClassName == false)
           
trigger_error('No Classname', E_USER_ERROR);

       
$this->module = $callerModuleName;

        if (
class_exists($callerClassName))
           
$this->caller = new $callerClassName();
        else
           
trigger_error('Class not exists: \''.$callerClassName.'\'', E_USER_ERROR);

        if (
is_object($this->caller))
        {
           
$this->setModuleInformation();
            if (
method_exists($this->caller, '__init'))
               
$this->caller->__init();
           
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
        }
        else
           
trigger_error('Caller is no object!', E_USER_ERROR);
    }

    function
__destruct() {
       
$this->setModuleInformation();
        if (
method_exists($this->caller, '__deinit'))
           
$this->caller->__deinit();
       
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
    }

    function
__isset($isset) {
       
$this->setModuleInformation();
        if (
is_object($this->caller))
           
$return = isset($this->caller->{$isset});
        else
           
trigger_error('Caller is no object!', E_USER_ERROR);
       
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
        return
$return;
    }

    function
__unset($unset) {
       
$this->setModuleInformation();
        if (
is_object($this->caller)) {
            if (isset(
$this->caller->{$unset}))
                unset(
$this->caller->{$unset});
        }
        else
           
trigger_error('Caller is no object!', E_USER_ERROR);
       
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
    }

    function
__set($set, $val) {
       
$this->setModuleInformation();
        if (
is_object($this->caller))
           
$this->caller->{$set} = $val;
        else
           
trigger_error('Caller is no object!', E_USER_ERROR);
       
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
    }

    function
__get($get) {
       
$this->setModuleInformation();
        if (
is_object($this->caller)) {
            if (isset(
$this->caller->{$get}))
               
$return = $this->caller->{$get};
            else
               
$return = false;
        }
        else
           
trigger_error('Caller is no object!', E_USER_ERROR);
       
$this->unsetModuleInformation();
        return
$return;
    }
   
    function
setModuleInformation() {
       
$this->caller->module = $this->module;
    }

    function
unsetModuleInformation() {
       
$this->caller->module = NULL;
    }
}

// Well this can be a Config Class?
class Config {
    public
$module;

    public
$test;

    function
__construct()
    {
        print(
'Constructor will have no Module Information... Use __init() instead!<br />');
        print(
'--> '.print_r($this->module, 1).' <--');
        print(
'<br />');
        print(
'<br />');
       
$this->test = '123';
    }
   
    function
__init()
    {
        print(
'Using of __init()!<br />');
        print(
'--> '.print_r($this->module, 1).' <--');
        print(
'<br />');
        print(
'<br />');
    }
   
    function
testFunction($test = false)
    {
        if (
$test != false)
           
$this->test = $test;
    }
}

echo(
'<pre>');
$wow = new Caller('Config', 'Guestbook');
print_r($wow->test);
print(
'<br />');
print(
'<br />');
$wow->test = '456';
print_r($wow->test);
print(
'<br />');
print(
'<br />');
$wow->testFunction('789');
print_r($wow->test);
print(
'<br />');
print(
'<br />');
print_r($wow->module);
echo(
'</pre>');
?>

Outputs something Like:

Constructor will have no Module Information... Use __init() instead!
-->  <--

Using of __init()!
--> Guestbook <--

123

456

789

Guestbook
up
10
dhuseby domain getback tld com
16 years ago
The above hint for using array_keys((array)$obj) got me investigating how to get __sleep to really work with object hierarchies.

With PHP 5.2.3, If you want to serialize an object that is part of an object hierarchy and you want to selectively serialize members (public, private, and protected) by manually specifying the array of members, there are a few simple rules for naming members that you must follow:

1. public members should be named using just their member name, like so:

<?php
class Foo {
    public
$bar;

    public function
__sleep() {
        return array(
"bar");
    }
}
?>

2. protected members should be named using "\0" . "*" . "\0" . member name, like so:

<?php
class Foo {
    protected
$bar;

    public function
__sleep() {
        return array(
"\0*\0bar");
    }
}
?>

3. private members should be named using "\0" . class name . "\0" . member name, like so:

<?php
class Foo {
    private
$bar;

    public function
__sleep() {
        return array(
"\0Foo\0bar");
    }
}
?>

So with this information let us serialize a class hierarchy correctly:

<?php

class Base {
    private
$foo = "foo_value";
    protected
$bar = "bar_value";

    public function
__sleep() {
        return array(
"\0Base\0foo", "\0*\0bar");
    }
}

class
Derived extends Base {
    public
$baz = "baz_value";
    private
$boo = "boo_value";

    public function
__sleep() {
       
// we have to merge our members with our parent's
       
return array_merge(array("baz", "\0Derived\0boo"), parent::__sleep());
    }
}

class
Leaf extends Derived {
    private
$qux = "qux_value";
    protected
$zaz = "zaz_value";
    public
$blah = "blah_value";

    public function
__sleep() {
       
// again, merge our members with our parent's
       
return array_merge(array("\0Leaf\0qux", "\0*\0zaz", "blah"), parent::__sleep());
    }
}

// test it
$test = new Leaf();
$s = serialize($test);
$test2 = unserialize($s);
echo
$s;
print_r($test);
print_r($test2);

?>

Now if you comment out all of the __sleep() functions and output the serialized string, you will see that the output doesn't change.  The most important part of course is that with the proper __sleep() functions, we can unserialize the string and get a properly set up object.

I hope this solves the mystery for everybody.  __sleep() does work, if you use it correctly :-)
up
7
smiley at HELLOSPAMBOT dot chillerlan dot net
8 years ago
A simple API wrapper, using __call() and the PHP 5.6 "..." token.
http://php.net/manual/functions.arguments.php#functions.variable-arg-list

<?php
namespace Example;

use
Exception;
use
ReflectionClass;
use
SomeApiInterface;
use
SomeHttpClient;
use
SomeEndpointHandler;

/**
* Class SomeApiWrapper
*
* @method SomeEndpointHandler method1(MethodParams $param1)
* @method SomeEndpointHandler method2(MethodParams $param1, AuthParams $param2 = null)
* ...
* @method SomeEndpointHandler method42()
*/
class SomeApiWrapper{

   
/**
     * @var \SomeHttpClient
     */
   
private $httpClient;

   
/**
     * @var array
     */
   
private $methodMap = [];

   
/**
     * SomeApiWrapper constructor.
     */
   
public function __construct(){
       
$this->mapApiMethods();
       
$this->httpClient = new SomeHttpClient();
    }

   
/**
     * The API is flat and has ~ 150 endpoints, all of which take optional parameters
     * from up to 3 groups (method params, authentication, filters). Instead of
     * implementing the interface and adding countless stubs that have basically
     * the same signature, i just map its methods here and use __call().
     */
   
private function mapApiMethods(){
       
$reflectionClass = new ReflectionClass(SomeApiInterface::class);

        foreach(
$reflectionClass->getMethods() as $m){
           
$this->methodMap[] = $m->name;
        }
    }

   
/**
     * Thanks to the PHP 5.6+ "..." token, there's no hassle with the arguments anymore
     * (ugh, bad pun). Just hand the method parameters into the endpoint handler,
     * along with other mandatory params - type hints are your friends.
     *
     * It's magic!
     *
     * @param string $method
     * @param array  $arguments
     *
     * @return \SomeEndpointHandler
     * @throws \Exception
     */
   
public function __call($method, $arguments){

        if(
in_array($method, $this->methodMap)){
            return new
SomeEndpointHandler($this->httpClient, $method, ...$arguments);
        }

        throw new
Exception('Endpoint "'.$method.'" does not exist');
    }

}
up
4
ctamayo at sitecrafting dot com
3 years ago
Due to a bug in PHP <= 7.3, overriding the __debugInfo() method from SPL classes is silently ignored.

<?php

class Debuggable extends ArrayObject {
  public function
__debugInfo() {
    return [
'special' => 'This should show up'];
  }
}

var_dump(new Debuggable());

// Expected output:
// object(Debuggable)#1 (1) {
//   ["special"]=>
//   string(19) "This should show up"
// }

// Actual output:
// object(Debuggable)#1 (1) {
//   ["storage":"ArrayObject":private]=>
//   array(0) {
//   }
// }

?>

Bug report: https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=69264
up
10
daan dot broekhof at gmail dot com
12 years ago
Ever wondered why you can't throw exceptions from __toString()? Yeah me too.

Well now you can! This trick allows you to throw any type of exception from within a __toString(), with a full & correct backtrace.

How does it work? Well PHP __toString() handling is not as strict in every case: throwing an Exception from __toString() triggers a fatal E_ERROR, but returning a non-string value from a __toString() triggers a non-fatal E_RECOVERABLE_ERROR.
Add a little bookkeeping, and can circumvented this PHP deficiency!
(tested to work PHP 5.3+)

<?php

set_error_handler
(array('My_ToStringFixer', 'errorHandler'));
error_reporting(E_ALL | E_STRICT);

class
My_ToStringFixer
{
    protected static
$_toStringException;

    public static function
errorHandler($errorNumber, $errorMessage, $errorFile, $errorLine)
    {
        if (isset(
self::$_toStringException))
        {
           
$exception = self::$_toStringException;
           
// Always unset '_toStringException', we don't want a straggler to be found later if something came between the setting and the error
           
self::$_toStringException = null;
            if (
preg_match('~^Method .*::__toString\(\) must return a string value$~', $errorMessage))
                throw
$exception;
        }
        return
false;
    }
   
    public static function
throwToStringException($exception)
    {
       
// Should not occur with prescribed usage, but in case of recursion: clean out exception, return a valid string, and weep
       
if (isset(self::$_toStringException))
        {
           
self::$_toStringException = null;
            return
'';
        }

       
self::$_toStringException = $exception;

        return
null;
    }
}

class
My_Class
{
    public function
doComplexStuff()
    {
        throw new
Exception('Oh noes!');
    }

    public function
__toString()
    {
        try
        {
           
// do your complex thing which might trigger an exception
           
return $this->doComplexStuff();
        }
        catch (
Exception $e)
        {
           
// The 'return' is required to trigger the trick
           
return My_ToStringFixer::throwToStringException($e);
        }
    }
}

$x = new My_Class();

try
{
    echo
$x;
}
catch (
Exception $e)
{
    echo
'Caught Exception! : '. $e;
}
?>
up
5
jeffxlevy at gmail dot com
18 years ago
Intriguing what happens when __sleep() and __wakeup() and sessions() are mixed. I had a hunch that, as session data is serialized, __sleep would be called when an object, or whatever, is stored in _SESSION. true. The same hunch applied when session_start() was called. Would __wakeup() be called? True. Very helpful, specifically as I'm building massive objects (well, lots of simple objects stored in sessions), and need lots of automated tasks (potentially) reloaded at "wakeup" time. (for instance, restarting a database session/connection).
up
6
ddavenport at newagedigital dot com
19 years ago
One of the principles of OOP is encapsulation--the idea that an object should handle its own data and no others'.  Asking base classes to take care of subclasses' data, esp considering that a class can't possibly know how many dozens of ways it will be extended, is irresponsible and dangerous.

Consider the following...

<?php
class SomeStupidStorageClass
{
  public function
getContents($pos, $len) { ...stuff... }
}

class
CryptedStorageClass extends SomeStupidStorageClass
{
  private
$decrypted_block;
  public function
getContents($pos, $len) { ...decrypt... }
}
?>

If SomeStupidStorageClass decided to serialize its subclasses' data as well as its own, a portion of what was once an encrypted thingie could be stored, in the clear, wherever the thingie was stored.  Obviously, CryptedStorageClass would never have chosen this...but it had to either know how to serialize its parent class's data without calling parent::_sleep(), or let the base class do what it wanted to.

Considering encapsulation again, no class should have to know how the parent handles its own private data.  And it certainly shouldn't have to worry that users will find a way to break access controls in the name of convenience.

If a class wants both to have private/protected data and to survive serialization, it should have its own __sleep() method which asks the parent to report its own fields and then adds to the list if applicable.  Like so....

<?php

class BetterClass
{
  private
$content;

  public function
__sleep()
  {
    return array(
'basedata1', 'basedata2');
  }

  public function
getContents() { ...stuff... }
}

class
BetterDerivedClass extends BetterClass
{
  private
$decrypted_block;

  public function
__sleep()
  {
    return
parent::__sleep();
  }

  public function
getContents() { ...decrypt... }
}

?>

The derived class has better control over its data, and we don't have to worry about something being stored that shouldn't be.
up
4
martin dot goldinger at netserver dot ch
18 years ago
When you use sessions, its very important to keep the sessiondata small, due to low performance with unserialize. Every class shoud extend from this class. The result will be, that no null Values are written to the sessiondata. It will increase performance.

<?
class BaseObject
{
    function
__sleep()
    {
       
$vars = (array)$this;
        foreach (
$vars as $key => $val)
        {
            if (
is_null($val))
            {
                unset(
$vars[$key]);
            }
        }   
        return
array_keys($vars);
    }
};
?>
up
3
yanleech at gmail dot com
16 years ago
Maybe we can using unserialize() & __wakeup() instead "new" when creating a new instance of class.

Consider following codes:

class foo
{
    static public $WAKEUP_STR = 'O:3:"foo":0:{}';
    public function foo(){}
    public function bar(){}
}

$foo = unserialize(foo::$WAKEUP_STR);
up
2
Anonymous
13 years ago
Concerning __set() with protected/private/overloaded properties, the behavior might not be so intuitive without knowing some underlying rules.  Consider this test object for the following examples...

<?php
class A {
    protected
$test_int = 2;
    protected
$test_array = array('key' => 'test');
    protected
$test_obj;
   
    function
__construct() {
       
$this->test_obj = new stdClass();
        }
       
    function
__get($prop) {
        return
$this->$prop;
        }
       
    function
__set($prop, $val) {
       
$this->$prop = $val;
        }
    }

$a = new A();

?>

Combined Operators (.=, +=, *=, etc): you must also define a companion __get() method to grant write -and- read access to the property.  Remember, "$x += $y" is shorthand for "$x = $x + $y".  In other words, "__set($x, (__get($x) + $y))".

Properties that are Arrays: attempting to set array values like "$a->test_array[] = 'asdf';" from outside this object will result in an "Indirect modification of overloaded property" notice and the operation completely ignored.  You can't use '[]' for array value assignment in this context (with the exception only if you made __get() return by reference, in which case, it would work fine and bypass the __set() method altogether).  You can work around this doing something like unioning the array instead:

<?php

$a
->test_array[] = 'asdf'; // notice given and ignored unless __get() was declared to return by reference
$a->test_array += array(1 => 'asdf'); // to add a key/value
$a->test_array = array("key" => 'asdf') + $a->test_array; // to overwrite a  key/value.

?>

Properties that are Objects: as long as you have that __get() method, you can freely access and alter that sub object's own properties, bypassing __set() entirely.  Remember, objects are assigned and passed by reference naturally.

<?php

$a
->test_obj->prop = 1; // fine if $a did not have a set method declared.

?>

All above tested in 5.3.2.
up
2
staff at pro-unreal dot de
11 years ago
To avoid instanciating the parent instead of the inherited class for __set_state() as reported by jsnell, you could use late static binding introduced in PHP 5.3:

<?php
class A {
    public static function
__set_state($data) {
        return new static();
    }
}

class
B extends A {
}

$instance = new B();
eval(
'$test = ' . var_export($instance, true) . ';');
var_dump($test);
// -> object(B)#2 (0) {
// }
?>
up
2
osbertv at yahoo dot com
12 years ago
Invoking a class inside a class results in an error.

<?php
class A
{
    public function
__invoke()
    {
        echo
"Invoking A() Class";
    }
}

class
B
{
    public
$a;
   
    public function
__construct()
    {
       
$this->a = new A();
    }
   
    public function
__invoke()
    {
        echo
"Invoking B() Class";
    }
}

$a = new A();
$b = new B();
$a();
$b();
$b->a();

?>

returns
Invoking B() Class
PHP Fatal error:  Call to undefined method B::a()
up
1
tyler at nighthound dot us
11 months ago
Please note that as of PHP 8.2 implementing __serialize() has no control over the output of json_encode(). you still have to implement JsonSerializable.
up
1
Wesley
12 years ago
Warning __toString can be triggerd more then one time

<?php
if(strstr(substr($obj,0,1024), 'somestuff')
    echo
$obj;
return
'missing somestuff at the start, create container!';

substr() will trigger a __toString aswell as echo $obj;
?>

wich cause a performance issue since it will gather all data twice.

what i used as a hotfix:

<?php
__toString
(){
  if(
null === $this->sToString)
    
$this->sToString = $this->_show();
  return
$this->sToString;
}
?>
up
1
rudie-de-hotblocks at osu1 dot php dot net
15 years ago
Note also that the constructor is executed also, and before __set_state(), making this magic function less magic, imho, (except for the ability to assign private members).
up
0
vali dot dr at gmail dot com
3 years ago
It should be noted that if you unset a class typed property and then try to access it,  __get will be called. But it MUST return the original type.

https://wiki.php.net/rfc/typed_properties_v2#overloaded_properties
up
-1
Anonymous
15 years ago
Serializing objects is problematic with references. This is solved redefining the __sleep() magic method. This is also problematic when parent class has private variables since the parent object is not accessible nor its private variables from within the child object.

I found a solution that seems working for classes that implements this __sleep() method, and for its subclasses. Without more work in subclasses. The inheritance system does the trick.

Recursively __sleep() call parent' __sleep() and return the whole array of variables of the object instance to be serialized.

<?php
class foo {
}

class
a {
  private
$var1;

  function
__construct(foo &$obj = NULL) {
   
$this->var1 = &$obj;
  }

 
/** Return its variables array, if its parent exists and the __sleep method is accessible, call it and push the result into the array and return the whole thing. */
 
public function __sleep() {
   
$a = array_keys(get_object_vars(&$this));
    if (
method_exists(parent, '__sleep')) {
     
$p = parent::__sleep();
     
array_push($a, $p);
    };
    return
$a;
  }
}

class
b extends a {
  function
__construct(foo &$obj = NULL) {
   
parent::__construct($obj);
  }
}

session_start();
$myfoo = &new foo();
$myb = &new b($myfoo);
$myb = unserialize(serialize(&$myb));
?>

This should work, I haven't tested deeper.
up
-1
docey
18 years ago
about __sleep and _wakeup, consider using a method like this:

class core
{

var $sub_core; //ref of subcore
var $_sleep_subcore; // place where serialize version of sub_core will be stored

function core(){
  $this->sub_core = new sub_core();
  return true;
}

function __wakeup()
{
  // on wakeup of core, core unserializes sub_core
  // wich it had stored when it was serialized itself
  $this->sub_core = unserialize($this->_sleep_subcore);
  return true;
}

function __sleep()
{
  // sub_core will be serialized when core is serialized.
  // the serialized subcore will be stored as a string inside core.
   $this->_sleep_subcore = serialize($this->sub_core);
   $return_arr[] = "_sleep_subcore";
   return $return_arr;
}

}

class sub_core
{
var $info;

function sub_core()
{
  $this->info["somedata"] = "somedata overhere"
}

function __wakeup()
{
  return true;
}

function __sleep()
{
  $return_arr[] = "info"
  return $return_arr;
}

}

this way subcore is being serialized by core when core is being serialized. subcore handles its own data and core stores it as a serialize string inside itself. on wakeup core unserializes subcore.

this may have a performance cost, but if you have many objects connected this way this is the best way of serializing them. you only need to serialize the the main object wich will serialize all those below which will serialize all those below them again. in effect causing a sort of chainreaction in wich each object takes care of its own info.

offcoarse you always need to store the eventualy serialized string in a safe place. somebody got experience with this way of __wakeup and __sleep.

works in PHP4&5
To Top